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Posts Tagged ‘value’

What Are Your Unique Natural Gifts? Here’s Why it Matters.

Vision of Your OwnAs I sat on the short wall outside of the post office, I noticed the stone; this was no New Hampshire granite or concrete blocks. The wall was made of sea shells, coral, perhaps even some driftwood mixed with concrete (yes, I was someplace warm). I wondered, “did they use this because it’s beautiful or because it’s the most abundant and, therefore, the cheapest?” My answer, of course, was all of the above and the similarity to our own personal resources was striking. Let me explain.

Our natural abilities, those attributes we were born with and that come most naturally, are also those abilities that are the easiest for us. For example, the ability to “see” in three-dimension comes easily to graphic artists, surgeons, carpenters, and massage therapists, if they’ve chosen a career in line with their natural abilities. Veterinarians have the natural ability to connect the dots when all the dots aren’t even there (creatures covered in fur who can’t talk, anyone?). Think of those things you can do without thinking about, that others remark on, making those things, well – remarkable. People wonder how you speak easily in front of a crowd, how you create what you create, how you remember so many details, how you assemble a puzzle when there are so many pieces still missing. These are your natural abilities; you can’t help but do them, you didn’t learn them, you’ve just always been able to do them and they come easily. In resource terms, the abilities are “cheap” – they require little energy on your part and they are abundant. Just like the coral and sea shells in the stone wall, your natural abilities are readily available and always accessible.

At first glance, you might not have called the sea shells and coral wall “beautiful” – at least not in a conventional way. What made the wall beautiful was its uniqueness, the combination of materials to make something new and never seen before (at least by me). The similarity to our natural abilities once again struck me; many of us would not consider our unique and natural abilities as beautiful, and they may actually annoy us at times. I used to wish that I could turn off my ideas sometimes, that I didn’t always see problems or how something would fail, until I learned what amazing abilities they are and how to use them. Recognizing the “beauty” in our natural abilities allows us to celebrate and leverage them and when we use them in our life’s work to help others, well – that is a beautiful thing.

What are your personal sea shells and coral? Look within and find those natural abilities that are abundant and beautiful, a never-ending resource to share in your work.

Doing More With Less: How to Avoid Fake Work

More-LessIn a question-and-answer session following a recent speech, I was asked the following question: “How should we respond when we’re constantly asked to do more with less?”

My answer might not have been particularly comforting, but it was honest: “The challenge to do more with less is industry agnostic,” I said. “Virtually everyone, everywhere is being given that challenge. And I expect that will be an ongoing mantra far into the future.”

Judging by the expression on the questioner’s face, I suspect that wasn’t what he wanted to hear.

But I wasn’t finished. The good news, I told him, is that the “do more with less” challenge presents a golden opportunity for smart, proactive people.

Most anyone can do less with more. That’s a no-brainer. Doing more with less requires strategic sorting of priorities. It’s fairly common for business people to tell me that in their organizations “everything is a priority so, therefore, nothing is a real priority.” That’s the equivalent of saying you’re too busy driving to stop and get gas.

Read more here.

Source: Forbes Magazine, Roger Dean Duncan, December 4, 2014

Instilling a Culture of Quality

 

checklist_imgHave you built a culture of quality in your business? While “striving for excellence” is part of nearly every business mission statement, what does that look like? A recent study by the Forbes Insights showed that companies that regularly instill quality measures and test them are more likely to meet their goals than companies that do not.

Instilling quality is more than just developing a mission statement and setting goals – it’s leadership in action, and it has to come from the top down, and should be reflective in every aspect of your business. Key questions, like the one in the study, can determine whether your team is on track or whether they should change course. Read on here.

Reference: Forbes’ Insights, November 5, 2014

The Art of Cold Calling: How to Connect Instead of Sell

Cold calling prospects, or even warm calls to referrals, stops many business professionals in their tracks. The other day a client telephonesaid to me “I fought in Afghanistan, I’ve been shot at as a police officer, but I’m afraid to make phone calls! What gives?” Adrenalin played a part in those scenarios, but beneath that, she felt the same emotion that she does when trying to call prospects: fear. Fear of being rejected, fear of saying the “right” words, the fear of not knowing what to say, period, all prevent us from making calls even when we know it could help our business. I’ve heard more than a couple business professionals say that they’re just giving up on calls, but there is an alternative.

Chances are, especially if you’ve been struggling with making calls, you’ve read that you need to be confident in what you have to offer and then you’ll “easily” make the calls. I consider confidence as Step 1; Step 2 is understanding your objective in calling beyond making a sale or scheduling an appointment. What feeling do you want as a result of the call? What emotion do you want to evoke in the person you’re calling?

When my client and I walked through these questions we discovered that she loved to connect with people – to hear their stories, to find a connection between herself and the person on the other end of the call. That’s really what each of us wants – to connect with another human being – whether it’s by phone, at a networking event, or by e-mail. We worry about the words we will say when calling someone, yet connecting is more about listening than talking.

To increase the effectiveness of your phone calls, choose your words deliberately and carefully to share your offer (remember it’s about the benefits not the features!) but most of all, listen and connect. Let that other person know that you care; even if you get a “no thanks” you’ll feel better about the call and they will remember you as that person who listened.

How, When, and Who: The 3 Key Pieces to Customer Service

Once you are clear about the value that you bring to your customers and clients (see the post True Value: What Business are You Really In?), or the WHAT, the next step is understanding the HOW, WHEN, and WHO of delivering it.

There are two elements of HOW we deliver our product or service:

  1. The actual process of a transaction. For example, one client’s customer process includes a written estimate, followed by a customer purchase order, parts’ order placement, parts are received, and finally, the work is scheduled and completed.
  2. The second HOW element is the way in which we do it. For example, a local car dealership has recently launched their “Negotiation Free” buying process. The dealership has defined how the transaction will happen not only for potential customers but also for employees. This piece of “HOW” determines in large part about HOW the transaction will feel to your customers and clients. Unless you define it for your employees, they will create their own system, and it may not be what you want. Think of a business visit you’ve made where you were treated poorly by an employee with poor customer service skills; I’m confident that is not how the owner would like it done.

The second element of product/service delivery systems is the WHEN. You may be shaking your head and thinking “whenever the customer walks through my door!” Stop and think about it, though, and you will realize that the transaction has several components, and they typically occur in a routine sequence. In the best scenario, you have designed a system so that transaction steps occur at the optimum point of time. Examples of WHEN that should be defined are:

  • Response to initial inquiry in service industries;
  • Your “Welcome”, offers of help, and general chatter in a consumer retail setting;
  • Length of time between a customer proposal and follow-up communication.

Much of the WHEN can be automated through email systems and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) software. Learn the capabilities that exist and use them.

Finally, there is the WHO of delivering your product/service – who does what when? Defining the key roles in this process is critical. This cuts down on confusion, and staff members taking on tasks that they should not: everyone stays in their lane, and tasks are not duplicated. It allows your team to focus on their given workload and become the subject-matter experts in their given area. This is especially key for your sales and customer support staff. A client recently discovered that when his administrative assistant made the proposal follow-up phone call, instead of the business owner, the acceptance rate shot through the roof. His customers most likely feel less “sold to” when his assistant calls to follow-up.

When these three elements – HOW, WHEN and WHO – are clearly defined from your customers’ perspective and are put into a system, customers will be treated consistently well by you and your staff, and in turn, increasing the likelihood that they will return.

Helen Dutton, A Vision of Your Own, has provided business and personal coaching for small business owners since 2000, providing online and face to face coaching for entrepreneurs, small business owners, start-up businesses as well as established businesses across the country. Clients come from New Hampshire, her home state, but she has also acted as a mentor to business owners in Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, the Denver area, and closer to home in the Boston area. Helen helps her clients develop their small business ideas, create marketing plans, improve operation efficiency, build customer service systems, build management and leadership skills, and develop confidence as a business owner. Helen provides business tips and resources through her blog and her newsletter, where you can also find business templates to help your business prosper.